I recommend rope of 5 millimeters or above for safety reasons. I generally get rope of 5 or 6 millimeters in diameter. Nothing I’ve done to it has fixed this. It may be because it’s sort of a short fibred rope, or it might just be the stuff I got hold of. There’s also a greater likelihood of surface abrasion and friction burn if you move it really quickly or with great pressure. Summary:. You need fewer wraps to get a safe distribution of pressure. I don’t see why there would be any issues washing it other than tangling; you wouldn’t have to dry it under tension because it’s not a natural fibre rope. (Updated 2018)Look, this is probably my favourite all round rope, with that Twisted Monk hemp as the favorite for bedroom purposes. Tossa jute is just freaking amazing, and has given me very much the results that I wanted, when I wanted them.

And wasn’t it just frustrating as hell? No. Hemp never stood a chance, because jute got to me first – as far as rope goes, it’s my one true love. And tossa especially, because it’s highly durable with low maintenance. Different people will have different priorities. Those who care less about appearance or who are less attracted to shibari may go down the nylon route.

Excellent give and flex, and there’s something truly awesome about the way it moves in your hands and when you’re wrapping it around someone. It makes the experience of tying someone a lot more fun. It actually polishes up and becomes shinier and smoother with use. That’s right, it doesn’t degrade. Update (2018): In my time, I’ve explored two different batches of hemp rope; what I’ve found, is that the supplier and the quality do make a huge difference. Anonymously sourced rope. Because it’s a natural fibre rope with decent tooth, you can do shibari and other styles of rope that rely on friction over knots, which is pretty great. You can take some great pictures with it; the rope in these pictures is that same cotton braid.

Let’s face it, sometimes the Internet is just more convenient. Next we have a polypropylene webbing. I had my Zen rope for quick synthetic ties, and I later moved on to focus on natural fibres. However, I snapped a couple of pictures of it while I was at Bunnings. Unfortunately, the anonymously sourced stuff I got has an annoying tendency to shed fibres. Nothing I’ve done to it has fixed this.

Let’s face it, sometimes the Internet is just more convenient. Next we have a polypropylene webbing. Nowhere near as pricey as the better natural fibre ropes, but it’s further up there than the previously mentioned ropes. The same goes for this as the other synthetic ropes with regards to friction; you will need to use knots. It’s reasonably light, and you can carry a lot of it around with you if you like using lots of rope. Because it’s a natural fibre rope with decent tooth, you can do shibari and other styles of rope that rely on friction over knots, which is pretty great. It feels really soft and smooth; very good flex, too. Likely to get quite compact knots with it. It’s not particularly aesthetic. You don’t get great photo worthy ties with it; though you still get a restrained person, which is always good, and may be all you want in your photo.

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